I hope you’ve all managed to work out which body shape you are after reading my last blog!  This next blog is going to explore the use of colour to bring your figure into proportion.  The ideal shape, regardless of size, is an hourglass - Equal top and bottom with a clearly defined waist.  Marilyn Monroe is the perfect example of an hourglass figure and she was a size 16!

Remember though, my blog is here for you to read and assess for yourself.  This is all subjective, and you may well disagree with me or be perfectly happy with the way you look.  If that’s the case please find a more exciting blog to read and maybe come back another day!

OK, so let’s get down to it!  I think it’s common knowledge that dark colours make something look smaller and light colours make the same thing look bigger.  It’s an optical illusion of course, but one that we can use to our advantage.  You see this all the time in decorating - paint a room a light colour to make it look bigger and darker to look smaller.

This blog really offers advice for anyone who doesn’t have that hourglass figure.  As you have already worked out what shape you are, my overall advice to you is to keep everything nice and balanced and don’t hide that waist.

So our first rule in starting to dress your shape is to wear the brightest, lightest colour on your smallest half and the darkest colour on the other half.  See my rough examples below.



If you are a triangle shape, always wear the darkest colour on the bottom half and the lightest on the top.  If you are an inverted triangle wear the lightest colour on the bottom and the darkest on the top.  An easy first rule.

And here are a couple of other tips.  If you are a triangle, wear colour across your shoulders so the eye is drawn to this area.  If you are an inverted triangle, wear colour in a V shape over the bust area.  For example, have a long scarf tied just under the bust or leave a cardigan, blouse or jacket undone to just underneath the bust with an undergarment in a different colour.

Ok, that should give you some food for thought and plenty to experiment with until next time, when we’ll be developing this theme further.  As always, if you have any questions or comments, please put them in a reply to this blog.

See you next time!

Luanne x

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